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Pro Bowl Recap: the same old issues remain

Earlier this week, within the walls of Real Sport Headquarters, us writers had a little debate about the


Earlier this week, within the walls of Real Sport Headquarters, us writers had a little debate about the Pro Bowl and its future. It got to the point that we felt it deserved to be put into writing and shared for you all to read. I fought the case that the Pro Bowl is fine as it is; well tonight didn’t do much to back me up. The last two captains to win the Pro Bowl – Michael Irvin and Jerry Rice – faced off with their squads to determine who is the best-of-the-best, and Team Irvin came out on top with a dominating 49-27 win. Russell Wilson was named MVP having passed for 164 yards and 3 touchdowns in the 1st quarter. The game started fairly well. Both teams came out firing and everyone appeared to be giving some kind of effort – there were some tackles. However, as the game progressed and the score line grew more and more lopsided the game became void of any aggression and turned into a proper sandlot game with Richard Sherman, Odell Beckham Jr, Devonta Freeman, Michael Bennett and Charles Woodson all swapping sides of the ball. It even featured a Jameis Winston snap to Cowboys center Travis Frederick. The 4th quarter seemed almost exactly like the 2012 Pro Bowl which sparked the switch to this format of the game, and is likely going to be the cause of some serious debate in the offseason regarding the future of the Pro Bowl. With that said, it should also be noted that a game of this nature will never be able to match the intensity of a regular season or playoff game – even a pre-season game – as the stakes are just not high enough, particularly at the end of the season as nobody wants to risk an injury just for an exhibition game. Furthermore, until the game got out of hand there were plenty of exciting plays from multiple players, the coaches were calling exotic plays and everyone was clearly having a lot of fun, even the fans. Ultimately, that is how the Pro Bowl should be viewed: as a means for a bit of fun for players, coaches and fans. But what the NFL has to ask itself is if that is worth the cost. Only time will tell.  

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Remy Cabache

Lifetime sports fan. I have written with RealSport since the NFL section started and I have also written for my own blog, EbonyBird.com and I have had several articles published in local newspapers covering my local (American) football team.

Pro Bowl Recap: the same old issues remain

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