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NFL Draft 2016: Complete Wide Receiver Rankings

After introducing some of the top prospects at each position over the early part of the off-season, it’s now on to the full positional ran


After introducing some of the top prospects at each position over the early part of the off-season, it’s now on to the full positional rankings over the next 5 weeks or so that will make up the combined big board. There will be a few changes to previous grades and relative ordering, as further work has been done. These should be more-or-less as it will stand now though. We begin with the wide receivers again, where we have 50 prospects with a draftable grade out of 185 scouted in total. Sr = Senior, Jr = Junior, So = Sophomore. An “r” prefix indicates a redshirt year (sat out for a year without playing, usually their first year of college). 1. Laquan Treadwell, Ole Miss, Jr – 1st Round Treadwell brings outstanding physicality to the position with an exceptionally strong and muscular frame that he uses to his advantage in various ways, to position against DBs, to fight for extra yards after contact, and also as possibly the best and most effective blocker at his position in the country. That strength extends to his mental game, where scouts are going to fall in love with his passion for the sport, his toughness and drive to succeed. If that wasn’t already evident in the respect shown by his teammates even early in his college career and his determined play on the field, then his work to overcome the injury setback the previous year sealed it. Treadwell does lack a number of ideal traits looked for in a number one receiver in the NFL. He’s not got true top end speed, which also results in him rarely being targeted deep down the field, and he doesn’t always manage to shake tight man coverage. What he does do though, along with using his physical frame, is do a superb job tracking the ball, timing his moves and jumps, and extend his hands away from his body to catch almost anything within his radius. The body control he consistently demonstrates is hugely impressive. His routes could use some polish but are solid and will improve with coaching; he’s the type to work hard and take on board what his coaches are telling him. Treadwell has his limitations, but there’s not many safer picks that a team could make in the first round come April. He has better hands than Coleman & Fuller, a better build than Doctson, and more consistency than Thomas. 2. Corey Coleman, Baylor, rJr – 1st Round During Art Briles tenure in Waco, there has been a long list of offensive skill players who have exploded statistically with some spectacular numbers that leap off the page. Coleman is next on that list after a quite ridiculous season that resulted in 74 receptions for 1,363 yards (that’s 18.4 yards per catch) and 20 TDs. It would be easy to look at recent receivers from this system who have had mixed success in the pros such as Kendall Wright and Terrence Williams. Or that Coleman measures in at around 5ft 9 & ½. But breaking down the film reveals a talent that ought to extend beyond Briles’ offence, to an electric and dynamic athletic talent that could see Coleman be what the Rams wanted Tavon Austin to be when they selected him no. 8 overall in the 2013 draft. Coleman brings elite level speed and athleticism with fantastic quick-twitch movement and changes of direction that completely flat-foot cover men. He may be short, but has an outstanding vertical leap that limits the issue somewhat. There’s a handful of bad drops on film that are a concern, but his ability to get himself open makes him a nightmare to try and cover. A lot of his big plays come purely from the mistakes he forces out of defensive backs. His routes are very simple, as is commonplace for Bears receivers, but whether it be by deep go routes down the field or quick receptions designed to get him the ball in space and make yards after the catch, Coleman is an exceptionally dangerous playmaker who can strike big on any touch of the ball. 3. Josh Doctson, TCU, rSr – 1st Round In terms of production, few can match that of Doctson over the last two seasons. After a breakout junior year, TCU’s top receiver has put together back to back 1,000+ yards seasons, and a combined 25 touchdowns since 2014. The Wyoming transfer wins with his polished technique, excellent hands, and his outstanding ability to track the ball in the air and adjust, a trait which he arguably has no rivals for in this year’s class. On 50/50 balls mid-air, it’s only a surprise when Doctson doesn’t come down with the ball, he is such a reliable target, who’s ball skills and concentration results in almost never failing to make the plays expected of him at this level. The questions surrounding Doctson this off-season were based around a relatively thin frame, and whether he had ideal athletic traits. He proved that he had that and then some at the combine, with great speed and lower body explosion, at a more defined build over 200 lbs. The quickness doesn’t always show up on film, but he’s done enough to push into the first round. 4. Michael Thomas, Ohio State, rJr – 1st Round Thomas could be a great example of a college football player who can far outplay what he did as an amateur and thrive as a pro in the NFL. Some of his peers in this wide receiver class have made a more obvious impact and have put up bigger numbers statistically, but Thomas has upside to match. The Ohio State system and the play of his quarterbacks, including the best of the bunch being more of a run threat, along with a group of talented targets that results in the ball being spread around a bit, has resulted in modest numbers for the junior. When the opportunities come his way however, Thomas is able to make plays and flash his impressive skill set. While not an elite burner, Thomas is impressively athletic to go with his size which he uses to make plays on all levels; short, intermediate and deep. Though he was not asked to run a full route tree for the Buckeyes, his routes are precise and effective, which he follows up by using his size well to position himself in front of DB’s or his height to high point the ball above them. Thomas also offers a legitimate threat after the catch to create yards and maximise the open space in front of him. Drops have at times been an issue. Often going long stretches without seeing any targets might suggest simply a concentration issue here. There could also be a little adjustment period. Thomas took some time early in his Ohio State career to learn the system, so much so that the decision was made to redshirt him in 2013 while he worked on his game within the scheme (and to focus on some academic struggles off the field). With his role in the offensive system already not being overly complex, learning an NFL calibre route tree, terminology and scheme might result in a relatively quieter rookie campaign. It ought to be worth the wait however for his potential. 5. Sterling Shepard, Oklahoma, Sr – 1st-2nd Round Having had struggles staying healthy each of the last couple years, Shepard was finally able to put together a full season for the Sooners and fulfil his potential, finishing with 86 receptions, 1288 yards and 11 touchdowns. Of course, with his small build, staying healthy and available is going to remain a little bit of a concern going forward when NFL teams make that decision on when to draft him, so his big 2015 was critical in helping towards easing that concern. There’s no doubt though that, when on the field, Shepard is an exceptional playmaker. No-one can match him this year for route running and ability to create space and separation. He gives corners’ fits trying to stick with him as he utilises his sharp, quick changes of direction and breaks in his routes with perfect timing that will serve him well as a pro and make him an ideal slot receiver. His timing, concentration and outstanding hands sees him make practically every makeable ball thrown his way, and often in spectacular style. With his athleticism, creativity and vision also making him a great candidate to return punts early on, something he did at times in his Oklahoma career, he could also be in some ways this year’s version of Tyler Lockett. 6. Will Fuller, Notre Dame, Jr – 2nd Round Perhaps the most dangerous deep threat, big play receiver in the country this season in college football, Fuller tore up defences early and often in 2015. Fuller was able to consistently stretch the defence, open up opportunities for teammates underneath, and deliver regularly with the production to back up the threat. While statistically Fuller has been great, he has plenty questions for how he projects to the next level. He has a very skinny build and lack of strength that will make it difficult for him to be a threat in other areas of the field, where defensive backs will be able to out-physical him and knock him off his routes. He could end up limited to being a fairly one-dimensional player. Adding to that issue of perhaps not offering much other than when going deep, he will have to deliver and come through with the catch on the occasions that he is targeted deep. Unfortunately, a significant issue this season for Fuller, despite the big production, has been too many drops. He prefers to cradle the ball into his body as much as he can, lacking consistent natural hands. There will be plenty of corners in the NFL who will be able to run with him down the field, and he shall have to come up with contested catches more often than he had to in college. He caught well at the combine, but it’s not the same situation, and his small hand measurements doesn’t help. He could be a frustrating player some games, then a game-changer the next. 7. Tyler Boyd, Pittsburgh, Jr – 2nd Round Exploding on to the scene as a freshman, Boyd broke many first year school records held by one Larry Fitzgerald, and also leaves after 3 consistently productive years as Pittsburgh’s all-time top receiver. That alone is eye-opening and speaks to his achievements in college. Boyd is a player that Pitt try to get the ball to in as many ways as possible. With starting a new QB this season, and, after losing their bell cow runner James Conner, the Panthers had to try and make the most of Boyd’s talents. That meant a lot of touches, but a drop in yards per touch from previous years. It’s hard to blame that on Tyler, as every defence they faced all year knew what was coming and keyed in on the junior. His 91 receptions therefore failed to get him to 1,000 receiving yards, but his 40 rush attempts going for an average of over 8.7 yards per carry was impressive and highlights his versatility. Overall, Boyd is a smooth if limited athlete with great ball skills, projecting nicely to an effective long-term slot receiver in the NFL who should be able to contribute early. 8. Charone Peake, Clemson, rSr – 2nd Round Arriving alongside Sammy Watkins in Death Valley, Peake was thought of as just as exciting a potential player as the future high pick of the Bills was, if not more so by some. Injuries have played their part though in limiting his ability to contribute, with 25 receptions all the way back in 2012 being his highest total prior to his senior year. He was finally able to flash some of his ability this season, with 50 receptions for 716 yards and 5 scores. Like Doctson, Peake is outstanding at adjusting and contorting his body to position himself to make catches. The injuries have not slowed him down, with not just straight line speed demonstrated by his blazing time in the 4.3’s (at his pro day) but also the short area quickness to create space for himself, all within a stout 6ft 2, 209 lb frame. He is certainly one of the more natural receivers in this 2016 class, both as an athlete and with his hands. Had he not missed so much time he would be talked about more, and if still available late on day 2, or at the start of day 3 of the draft, Peake could turn out to be quite a bargain that outplays many taken before him. 9. Braxton Miller, Ohio State, rSr – 2nd Round Every year there are some wildcard prospects that are big unknowns on draft weekend. Miller is the ultimate wildcard pick at the receiver position this time around. There’s no doubt that Miller is one of the most outstanding athletes out of this entire draft class regardless of position. The situation might have factored in, due to the emergence of both Cardale Jones and JT Barrett while he sat out 2014 with an injured shoulder, but his decision to convert to wide receiver/H-back for his last year was a big boost to his draft stock. Regardless of that decision, Miller would have projected to either wide receiver or running back for the NFL. The fact that he gave scouts a full season of film to show what the potential could be greatly helps. And while he didn’t put up huge numbers, and was quiet for long stretches of games, Miller really surprised with how natural the foundations of the position came to him. His often crisp routes and natural hands frequently resulted in some highlight reel plays, which combined with that exceptional creativity with his athletic abilities makes it really difficult to ignore the exciting potential upside. Something tells me that a team is going to take a shot on Miller in the second round and I’m certainly not going to bet against that move paying off big time down the line. During the pre-draft process some of the work still to be done has been made clear however, but that’s what NFL coaches are paid to correct and to get the most out of talents like Miller. 10. Leonte Caroo, Rutgers, Sr – 3rd Round It’s been a tumultuous season for the star Knights receiver. A domestic violence incident led to his suspension from the Rutgers team in week two of the season, something that at the least will have resulted in tough questioning in interviews, and at the most might have taken him completely off some teams’ boards. In addition, he’s had injury troubles that have slowed him for some of the games on his return. The past couple seasons though, and when closer to full health this year, Caroo is a big play machine who can match up with any DB in the country, regardless of size or speed. Caroo is quick and well built himself, with the skills to get open, and great hands. Whether it’s on short routes, runs after the catch or deep balls, the versatile receiving threat is so difficult to keep out of the end zone, recording 39 touchdowns in the past three seasons, despite the time missed and averaged close to 21 yards per catch in 2015. Were it not for the question marks, it would have been hard to imagine him making it past round two, and may still end up going there if a team trusts him enough to behave. 11. Pharoh Cooper, South Carolina, Jr – 3rd Round Given the horrendous play at quarterback and overall downturn for the Gamecocks’ offence this year, it really speaks to what an exceptional player Cooper is and how well he played despite the adversity that he still was able to earn all-conference selection in 2015 in the SEC. Cooper has been one of the most versatile playmakers since joining college football, with South Carolina using him in a multitude of ways to maximise his touches. On top of his primary role as a receiver (both in the slot and outside), he is just as dangerous as a runner out of the backfield, a returner on special teams, or even on trick plays throwing the ball, having thrown for 3 touchdowns in his career. Cooper has the skills of a receiver, but within a running back’s body, which helps him excel after the catch and in space, where he shows all the vision and balance of a true RB. The possibilities for a creative offensive coordinator are many, as he should continue to be a versatile offensive weapon at the next level too, especially with a more effective quarterback conducting the operation. Given that he ran fairly simplistic routes that involved a lot of quick screens and dump-offs or deep straight line go routes, he can become even more dangerous as he develops a more expansive route tree with time. He ought to be a very useful addition to any roster on day 2. 12. Ricardo Louis, Auburn, Sr – 3rd-4th Round One of my favourite sleeper prospects entering the season, throughout the season, and entering the draft build up. He’s not much of a sleeper anymore though, particularly after an excellent showing at the combine in February, where he was among the fastest of the receivers in attendance, and looked superb in drills. On the field, his athleticism absolutely translates. His fast, fluid movement at 6ft 2 & 215 lbs is tough to contend with. Auburn’s offense was a bit of a shambles on offense this season, struggling to replace Nick Marshall at QB, and as a result, Louis was unable to fully demonstrate what he could do. Despite that he still put up respectable numbers, and could well flourish in a more efficient pass attack. There’s work to be done, with ball security too frequently proving troublesome, and learning a more complete set of pro-style routes beyond the simplistic and restricted number he was asked to run in college. 13. Malcolm Mitchell, Georgia, rSr – 4th Round If only it weren’t for all the injuries that slowed him down – his knee troubles could still prove off-putting depending on his medicals. Mitchell was developing in to one of the top receivers in the country before missing the entire 2013 season, then being limited in 2014. Thankfully he was back to his best as a senior this year, and once again looked a real playmaker. Mitchell is a natural at the position, who knows how to find or create space for himself that so many others just don’t have and likely will never be able to learn as effectively. An interesting side note; Mitchell is also a published children’s book author! 14. Rashard Higgins, Colorado State, Jr – 4th Round Higgins unfortunately lacks in almost every area physically, which hurts his draft stock. His very thin frame just doesn’t look the part even at the college level, and doesn’t make up for it with his athleticism, where he is rather slow and lacking explosive or dynamic traits. He has it above the shoulders though, with the football IQ, awareness and understanding of both his offense and the defense he’s facing, that has seen him put up big numbers for the Rams. His 2014 season was insanely good, where he had 96 catches for 1,750 yards (over 18 yards per catch) and 17 TDs. His numbers dropped this year, but that’s not a surprise given he lost his QB Garrett Grayson, and was still able to put up impressive stats with a much more inexperienced young thrower taking over. 15. Kenny Lawler, California, rJr – 4th Round Another who is not an ideal athlete, and comes from the very passing-friendly Cal offense led by Jared Goff; certainly helps! Lawler is by far the most talented of a group of five efficient senior receivers that the soon-to-be first round pick had to target, with Lawler helped in particular by his good height and massive hands that led to some spectacular grabs over the course of the season. They are interspersed with drops as well though, and generally just doesn’t have too much to get excited about. Lawler could end up being a career-long 3rd receiver on a depth chart. 16. Aaron Burbridge, Michigan State, Sr – 4th-5th Round After the graduation of Tony Lippett, Burbridge became Connor Cook’s go-to guy this season, and often bailed his QB out by making tough grabs on throws under tight coverage that should never have been attempted, as Cook liked to focus in on his top target too often. He had one of the epic battles of the season going up against arguably the best cover corner in the country in Michigan’s Jourdan Lewis that saw both players push each other, with both emerging about equal in their duel. Burbridge isn’t the biggest but is reliable with enough athleticism to continue to make plays at the next level. 17. Paul McRoberts, Southeast Missouri State, Sr – 5th Round A small school talent who has both the physical (at 6ft 2, 202 lbs) and mental toughness (which included going through some personal tragedies off the field) to do well in the NFL. He’s been highly praised for his competitiveness and work ethic that will help with the step up. He’s an adept route runner at multiple levels, looking more polished than most from his level. Watching his film, he is constantly getting open much more frequently than his QB manages to spot him, with the play from his signal caller something that must have been frustrating over the years, not that he’s shown it outwardly. McRoberts shows some likeable traits, such as good hand use off the snap when faced with press coverage, and then using those excellent hands to make tough and at times spectacular grabs out of the air. Despite the relatively ineffective QB play, he still finished just shy of a 1,000-yard season as a senior, with 76 receptions for 940 yards and 9 TDs. 18. Devon Cajuste, Stanford, rSr – 5th Round The big receiver has rare athleticism for his 6ft 4, 234 lb size, that is just brimming with untapped potential to exploit. Some teams will consider him as a move tight end option as well. He’s proved dangerous from the slot, where linebackers and safeties have had trouble handling him. The production was disappointing in his final year with Stanford but there’s so much to work with. He had one of the most under-rated drill performances of the combine when he ran a ridiculous 6.49-second three-cone time that no-one at any position came close to matching. 19. Chris King, Duquesne, Sr – 5th Round Another small school guy who brings so many next-level skills. While averagely sized, King is a smooth runner with quickness. He runs sharp, polished routes, with great awareness of the defense he’s facing, where to find space, to use his whole body to complete catches including tapping his feet on the sidelines. He can make plays over the middle as well as deep, and catches the ball cleanly in stride with his natural hands. He backed it up on the stat sheet, with 81 receptions, 1136 yards (14.0 per catch) & 8 TDs in 2015. 20. Thomas Duarte, UCLA, Jr – 5th Round A difficult fit at the next level; some will list him at tight end, but at 6ft 2, 231 lbs, he might not fit that role too well, and the slot receiver position might be where he makes his plays. He may lack ideal straight line speed, but changes direction sharply and quickly, playing faster than he tests, in particular in short areas. Duarte has been a great red zone target, and piled up 17 touchdowns the past two years combined. He won’t fit every scheme, but is a playmaker over the middle. 21. Tajae Sharpe, Massachusetts, Sr – 5th Round Has helped himself greatly at the East-West Shrine, Senior Bowl and Combine, in particular showing off his fantastic hands that seemingly never let the ball hit the ground. On film though, he has issues dealing with being handled physically and is nowhere near as effective when pressured by tight coverage. 22. Cayleb Jones, Arizona, rJr – 5th Round A big target at 6ft 3 & 210 lbs, Jones put up some good numbers for the Wildcats after transferring from Texas, but delving in to the stats a bit more showed that he really beat up on a lot of weak opponents and struggled to make as big an impact against better teams faced. Despite not having top end speed, he has such great body control and comes down with tough grabs when thrown up in his direction for jump balls. 23. Cody Core, Ole Miss, Sr – 5th Round Under-used over his career with the Rebels, but came up with big plays at key times when finally used. He’s a great height/weight/speed combo guy, and took advantage of the combine to demonstrate the possibilities and his athletic skills that his college team didn’t make the most of. 24. Keyarris Garrett, Tulsa, rSr – 5th-6th Round Took advantage of the Baylor-copy offense that was installed this year to put up a ridiculous 96 catches, 1588 yards and 8 touchdowns. The 6ft 3, 220 lb receiver is not a great athlete though, and lacks little intricacies such as working back to his QB and will struggle to generate his own separation at the next level. 25. Nelson Spruce, Colorado, rSr – 5th-6th Round Doesn’t have the size or speed desired, but smart and savvy player who finds a way to make plays every game which led to a whopping 195 catches for 2,251 yards over the last couple seasons. 26. Jordan Payton, UCLA, Sr – 5th-6th Round Though he ran fast at the combine, Payton without question does not play even close to that on the field. He’s going to make some plays underneath, catch what he ought to, and probably not much else. But he is tough, strongly built for the pros, and does his job. High character and great work ethic. Late Round Grades: 27. Tevaun Smith, Iowa, Sr – 6th Round. 28. Chris Moore, Cincinnati, rSr – 6th Round. 29. Bralon Addison, Oregon, rJr – 6th Round. 30. Jalin Marshall, Ohio State, rSo – 6th Round. 31. Robby Anderson, Temple, Sr – 6th-7th Round. 32. Michael Thomas, Southern Mississippi, Sr – 6th-7th Round. 33. Roger Lewis, Bowling Green, rSo – 7th Round. 34. Kolby Listenbee, TCU, rSr – 7th Round. 35. Moritz Boehringer, Schwäbisch Hall (GER) – 7th Round 36. Chris Brown, Notre Dame, Sr – 7th Round. 37. Geronimo Allison, Illinois, Sr – 7th Round. 38. Jordan Williams, Ball State, Sr – 7th Round. 39. Deandre Reaves, Marshall, Sr – 7th Round. 40. Alex Erickson, Wisconsin, rSr – 7th Round. 41. Byron Marshall, Oregon, Sr – 7th Round. 42. De’Runnya Wilson, Mississippi State, Jr – 7th Round. 43. Canaan Severin, Virginia, Sr – 7th-PFA (Priority Free Agent). 44. Alonzo Russell, Toledo, rSr – 7th-PFA. 45. Jay Lee, Baylor, rSr – 7th-PFA. 46. Joshua Perkins, Washington, rSr – 7th-PFA. 47. Darrin Peterson, Liberty, Sr – 7th-PFA. 48. Rashawn Scott, Miami (Fla.), rSr – 7th-PFA. 49. Demarcus Robinson, Florida, Jr – 7th-PFA. 50. Daniel Braverman, Western Michigan, rJr – 7th-PFA. Priority Free Agents: 51. K.J. Maye, Minnesota, Sr 52. Jamaal Jones, Montana, rSr 53. Demarcus Ayers, Houston, Jr 54. Mekale McKay, Cincinnati, Sr 55. Marquez North, Tennessee, Jr 56. D’haquille Williams, Auburn, Sr 57. Jakeem Grant, Texas Tech, rSr 58. Malachi Jones, Appalachian State, Sr 59. Danny Anthrop, Purdue, Sr 60. Hunter Sharp, Utah State, Sr 61. Ed’Marques Batties, Middle Tennessee, Sr 62. Trevor Davis, California, rSr 63. Jamal Robinson, Louisiana-Lafayette, rSr 64. Jaydon Mickens, Washington, Sr 65. Wendall Williams, Cumberlands, Sr 66. Quinshad Davis, North Carolina, Sr 67. Herb Waters, Miami (Fla.), Sr Potential to make a roster or practice squad: 68. Bryce Treggs, California, Sr 69. Max Morrison, Cincinnati, Sr 70. Quenton Bundrage, Iowa State, rSr 71. Dom Williams, Washington State, rSr 72. Mitch Mathews, Brigham Young, rSr 73. Ed Eagan, Northwestern State, Sr 74. Amir Carlisle, Notre Dame, rSr 75. Wayne Capers Jr., Duquesne, Sr 76. Casey Martin, Southern Mississippi, Sr 77. Maurice Harris, California, rSr 78. Darius Powe, California, Sr 79. Shaq Washington, Cincinnati, rSr 80. Kenneth Scott, Utah, rSr 81. Davonte Allen, Marshall, rSr 82. J.D. McKissic, Arkansas State, rSr 83. Brandon Swindall, Utah State, rSr 84. Stephen Anderson, California, Sr 85. LaDarius Brown, Sam Houston State, rSr 86. Devin Fuller, UCLA, Sr 87. Jared Dangerfield, Western Kentucky, Sr Outside shot at making a team: 88. Christian Jones, Northwestern, Sr 89. Ellis Henderson, Montana, rJr 90. David Richards, Arizona, rSr 91. Max McCaffrey, Duke, Sr 92. Tevin Jones, Memphis, rSr 93. Von Pearson, Tennessee, Sr 94. Richard Mullaney, Alabama, Sr 95. Devon Blackmon, Brigham Young, rSr 96. Devin Lucien, Arizona State, rSr 97. Roman Namdar, Mount Union, Sr 98. Jarvis Bentley, Troy, Sr 99. Paul Turner, Louisiana Tech, rSr 100. Marcus Johnson, Texas, Sr 101. Reggie Diggs, Richmond, Sr 102. Autrey Golden, Texas-El Paso, Sr 103. T.J. Thorpe, Virginia, rSr 104. Jerrard Randall, Arizona, Sr 105. Bubba Poole, Utah, rSr 106. Daje Johnson, Texas, Sr 107. Durron Neal, Oklahoma, Sr Something to like about their game, but longshot to make a team: 108. Mose Frazier, Memphis, Sr 109. Gary Chambers, Arizona State, rSr 110. Jesse Kroll, Central Michigan, Sr 111. Zach Vraa, North Dakota State, rSr 112. Cedric Gilbert, Abilene Christian, rSr 113. Tres Houston, Arkansas State, rSr 114. Jenson Stoshak, Florida Atlantic, Sr 115. Rashon Ceaser, Louisiana-Monroe, rSr 116. Karnorris Benson, Western Carolina, rSr 117. KJ Myers, West Virginia, rSr 118. Ron Willoughby, Buffalo, rSr 119. Terenn Houk, Brigham Young, Sr 120. DeAnthony Arnett, Michigan State, rSr 121. Alex Chisum, Cincinnati, Sr 122. Donovan Harden, Georgia State, rSr 123. Jeff Glover, Eastern Kentucky, Sr 124. Marvin Shinn, South Alabama, rSr 125. Macgarrett Kings Jr., Michigan State, Sr 126. Simms McElfresh, Appalachian State, rSr 127. Antwane Grant, Western Kentucky, Sr 128. Devon Price, Ohio Northern, Sr 129. Shamier Jeffery, South Carolina, rSr 130. Kody Cook, Kansas State, Sr 131. Brandon Sheperd, Oklahoma State, Sr 132. Willie Quinn, Southern, Sr 133. Bobo Beathard, Appalachian State, rSr 134. Ben Roberts, Montana, Sr 135. Madison Mangum, Idaho State, rSr 136. Nnamdi Agude, Sacramento State, Sr 137. Wesley Leftwich, Missouri, Sr 138. Kyle Klein, Kansas State, rSr 139. Michaelee Harris, Akron, rSr 140. Joe Morrow, Mississippi State, rSr 141. Casey Osborne, Delta State, Sr 142. Jon Schnaars, East Stroudsburg, rSr 143. Juwan Brescacin, Northern Illinois, Sr 144. Marquise Cushon, Pittsburg State, Sr 145. Andrew Williams, Youngstown State, Sr 146. Melvin Ray, Auburn, Sr 147. Tommylee Lewis, Northern Illinois, Sr 148. Joe Hansley, Colorado State, Sr The rest: 149. Xavier Roberson, Southeastern Louisiana, Sr 150. Thomas Carter III, Portland State, Sr 151. Darius Joseph, Southern Methodist, rSr 152. Jordan Fredrick, Wisconsin, rSr 153. Marcel Caver Jr, Winston Salem, rSr 154. Jamal Turner, Nebraska, Sr 155. KJ Brent, Wake Forest, rSr 156. Jordan Snellings, Furman, Sr 157. Valdez Showers, Florida, Sr 158. Kevin Gulyas, Villanova, Sr 159. Jordan Thompson, West Virginia, Sr 160. Andrew Fischer, Harvard, Sr 161. Andrew Flory, Fort Hays State, rSr 162. Shane Williams-Rhodes, Boise State, Sr 163. Tyler Dube, Sacred Heart, Sr 164. Ja’Juan Story, TCU, rSr 165. Ryan Burbrink, Bowling Green, rSr 166. Ruben Gonzalez, Jacksonville State, Sr 167. Miles Shuler, Northwestern, Sr 168. Danny Woodson II, South Alabama, rSr 169. Chris Shillings, Ball State, rSr 170. John Israel, Coastal Carolina, Sr 171. Christian Reeves, William & Mary, Sr 172. Pig Howard, Tennessee, Sr 173. Rollins Stallworth, Stanford, Sr 174. Gerald Thomas, Sam Houston State, Sr 175. Chad Ward, Bryant, Sr 176. Kevin Glears, Charleston Southern, rSr 177. Kevin Francis, North Carolina A&T, Sr 178. Cameron Dickerson, Northwestern, rSr 179. Bryan Holmes, Troy, Sr 180. David Glidden, Oklahoma State, Sr 181. AJ Troup, Michigan State, rSr 182. David Bush, McNeese State, Sr 183. Mike Burke, Villanova, Sr 184. Ashton Broyld, West Georgia, Sr 185. Jerel Harrison, Delaware, rSr


Rebecca Rennie

Hello all, I'm Rebecca, also going by Bex, and I am the RealSport College Football Editor, as well as writer and NFL Draft analyst.  I also edit other sports including the CFL, cycling and golf, while occasionally contributing to the NFL section as well.  I'm a fan of most sports and enjoy discussing with fellow fans, so do please comment on articles and interact.  A big fan of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, and of the Central Florida Knights in college.

NFL Draft 2016: Complete Wide Receiver Rankings

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