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2016 NFL Draft: Round 4, Picks 123-128 grades & analysis

Pick 123 (Round 4, Pick 25) - Pittsburgh Steelers select Jerald Hawkins, OT, Louisiana StatePick analysis: 


Pick 123 (Round 4, Pick 25) – Pittsburgh Steelers select Jerald Hawkins, OT, Louisiana State

Pick analysis: Very long limbed athlete who uses his length well, good weight distribution and has great hands. Very quick off the snap and willing to fight on the snap. Very slim build for a lineman and although he is quick to win the first part of the play, lets players get back in and doesn’t finish the play well. Not a natural bend so pads are too high on some plays, will help in rotation for the moment, could eventually start. Player analysis: After making 26 starts at right tackle for the Tigers the previous two years, Hawkins took over on the left side for his final year in 2015.  Though he has impressive length and natural quick movement and athleticism, Hawkins has a very skinny frame for a tackle, looking more like an inline blocking tight end almost, than an actual offensive lineman.  His game also lacks the power and punch ideally looked for, which is further not helped by some poor body position and anchoring technique.  Though there’s some developmental potential, Hawkins just doesn’t look the part either physically or technically to take more than a mid to late day 3 flier on him and try to develop. Grade: B-  

Pick 124 (Round 4, Pick 26) – Chicago Bears select Deon Bush, S, Miami

Pick analysis: THe Bears biggest need has been defensive back for a while, particularly at the safety spot this year. He has good size and showed good measurables at the NFL Scouting Combine. However, his game film is not very good, especially against Florida State. He has good special teams value and projects as a box safety which isn’t exactly what the Bears need. Player analysis: Overall, Bush has greatly under-achieved during his time with the Hurricanes, to the point where you wouldn’t argue were he to go very late in the draft. He is certainly still worth a mid to late selection though as he has flashed the talent at times that might have led to an early round pick had he consistently shown that ability. Injuries throughout his time in college factor in to those troubles in being more consistent, and durability is another question mark that could hurt his stock further. The positives are in his good length and impressive athleticism to cover a wide range of the field. There’s versatility to contribute on safety blitzes to make plays in the backfield and to make some impressive interceptions in coverage. He delivers some big hits, loving to throw his body around, occasionally missing entirely on those however. If he can stay healthy and develop some consistency, he does have starter potential and as a result might prove to end up a nice steal late on. Grade: C-  

Pick 125 (Round 4, Pick 27) – Indianapolis Colts select Antonio Morrison, LB, Florida

Pick analysis: No one is more intense than Morrison and no one plays harder. Loves to compete and looks the part. Natural born leader and incredibly good tackler. Isn’t necessarily a full time starter, but when he is on the field the opposition know about it. Bad knee injury has derailed his career somewhat. His tackling is intense but doesn’t have the best form so can miss a few tackles. Player analysis: It’s pretty incredible that Morrison was able to play the entire season in 2015. After a terrible knee injury in the previous year’s bowl game, he was expected to not be back till about the mid-point of his senior year, yet recovered in only around 6 months ready to go. It speaks to the kind of determined, driven personality he is. That is absolutely part of his on-field game as well, with a highly aggressive and intimidating style of play that sees him charge around the field and hitting exceptionally hard when tackling. He can be over-aggressive at times to his detriment, but for the most part is highly effective leading to triple-digit tackles the past two years. His instincts and competitiveness will translate well to the next level. The issue is his durability, with that bad knee injury not his first, with another in 2013 as well. Added to his relatively small stature, he could fall further in the draft than his excellent play deserves. Grade: C  

Pick 126 (Round 4, Pick 28) – Kansas City Chiefs select Demarcus Robinson, WR, Florida

Pick analysis: Back-to-back Gators. Robinson is a very good athlete with obvious talent and has potential to be a very, very effective receiver. However, he does have off-field issues, he runs lazy routes and he has too many drops. Some scouts go as far as calling him immature and selfish. All of this means he is a big risk for a 4th round pick, despite the obvious upside. Player analysis: Demarcus Robinson was our 49th-ranked receiver in this year’s draft. Grade: C+  

Pick 127 (Round 4, Pick 29) – Chicago Bears select Deiondre’ Hall, CB, Northern Iowa

Pick analysis: Can play both corner and safety, versatile player, will desire and huge length. Questions about whether he plays safety or corner at the top level. Fantastic tackler with great form. Doesn’t have a natural position, but he is coming in to play and to contribute early. Is a big time gamer. Player analysis: Deiondre’ Hall is our 31st-ranked cornerback in this year’s draft. Grade: B  

Pick 128 (Round 4, Pick 30) – Arizona Cardinals select Evan Boehm, C, Missouri

Pick analysis: Being a four year starter is a massive advantage when it comes to centers. He is smart, he is tough, he is durable, he has good instincts, he is a good leader and he is experienced. That is what you want from a center. He has very good power at the point of attack and can just overpower people to create running lanes. He could easily be an effective starter for the Cardinals early. Player analysis: Lots of experience has been a common theme for all these top graded centers in this class, but Boehm takes that to another level, having started 52 consecutive games in the SEC for the Tigers over his four seasons after stepping into the line-up immediately as a freshman back in 2012.  That was initially at left guard his first year before shifting to center, and while that additional experience at a different spot is useful, there’s no question he is a center only for the pros.  He is one of those prospects that NFL teams know more or less exactly what they are going to get.  Mizzou, like Iowa, have also been steady producers of talented, dependable offensive lineman in recent years, and Boehm continues that trend.  His frame is broad, stout, strong and sturdy; ready for the pros.  His game is one of physicality, tenacity and unrelenting effort on every snap.  There’s no doubt that he is somewhat limited by his lack of athleticism, speed, lateral movement and heavy feet, but he does get the maximum out of his abilities to compensate, even if his upside is fairly limited.  He does the basics very well in both pass protection and when blocking in the run game.  His effectiveness in protecting the pocket resulted in the impressive stat of not allowing either a single sack or a single QB hit during his junior season in 2014.  Although he does do a solid job using his power to create holes for his running back, the lack of athletic ability results in poor play in space on the second level to seek out additional blocks.  Boehm may not have everything ideally looked for, hence the 5th round grade here, but he’s certainly NFL ready, with more power and physicality than most rookies at the position are ready to offer. Grade: A-


2016 NFL Draft: Round 4, Picks 123-128 grades & analysis

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