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2016 NFL Draft: Round 3 Analysis & Grades – Picks 79 – 83

Pick 79 - Philadelphia Eagles


Pick 79 – Philadelphia Eagles

Isaac Seumalo, C, Oregon State

Seumalo is a solid football player, who can play across all three interior positions on the line. He has had a few injury problems, however he fought through the adversity and made it back into the lineman. This is a decent depth pick, however with Seumalo’s documented injury problems, and a position without a desperate need, it feels too early to spend on depth with other glaring holes. Thomas Clapham

Player Analysis

After receiving a lot of offers as a highly regarded prospect out of high school, Seumalo didn’t take long to establish himself and justify the expectations, immediately earning the starting role at center his freshman season.  Unfortunately, after playing to a very good level each of his first two seasons, his progress was stalled by a bad foot injury that required two surgeries and a slow recovery time that cost him his 2014 season.  While that will raise an injury red flag that will need to be checked out medically, he did return to play once again to a high standard this past season.  He could have used his medical redshirt from the lost season to return in 2016, but with his degree completed instead chose to leave for the NFL now.  Seumalo is built for the interior line, with the desired strength and size to fit in at the next level.  A smart player, he’s proven a quick learner, both in how quickly he was able to immediately start that first year, but also with how he has been able to step in as required at multiple spots over this three seasons of playing.  As a sophomore, 2 of his starts came at right tackle, and on his return to action this year his starts came at right guard and left tackle, giving him experience at four of the five positions across the O-line.  He can bring some of that potential versatility to the team who drafts him, and indeed could be considered as either a center or a guard as his primary position.  I like him in the middle however.  One of the traits that caught my eye early in his career was how quickly he got from snapping the ball to engaging contact with his opposing defender and establishing a strong anchor where he matches up well in strength versus strength.  His heavy hands and lower body are backed up by his impressive technique and body positioning.  Pre-injury he did tend to get beaten a bit too often around his edge early when facing interior pass rush attempts for sacks up the middle, but encouragingly looked to have cleaned that up on his return to action in 2015.  Provided the medicals check out, there’s not really anything lacking in Seumalo’s game, and can bring much-valued depth to multiple spots. (Rebecca Rennie)

Grade C-

Pick 80 – Buffalo Bills

Adolphus Washington, DT, Ohio State

Kyle Williams is getting older so they need to find his replacement. Urban Meyer, his former coach, praises his pass rushing skills, going as far as to say “he’s a DE in a DT’s body”. He has a great variety of pass rush moves that make him a huge mismatch with interior o-lineman. He must work on his run defense but he has great tools to do just that. Remy Cabache  

Player Analysis

Washington was a former 5-star recruit, and his reputation is further helped by being a regular part of a fantastic Ohio State defense over the past couple years.  Those facts seem to have given a boost to his draft stock more so than it perhaps deserves.  His play his actually a little underwhelming and his traits project pretty averagely to the next level where it’s difficult to be convinced that he will be a stand out at the next level to justify some of the very early grades some have given him.  Washington has good length, and initially played on the edge of the line prior to his junior season, before converting to the inside for the past couple years.  His bulk on his frame still leaves him a little slighter-looking than preferred for the middle, and he is often comfortably controlled.  The motor can run a little hot and cold too, some plays looking explosive, other times looking tame in his effort and disinterested.  He does flash at times though, enough to warrant a late day two selection, though there’s a chance some teams consider him earlier than that.  He wasn’t helped by his citation for solicitation that led to his suspension for the season-ending bowl game, that will have led to questions on his character and decision-making during interviews with teams. (Rebecca Rennie)

Grade B+

Pick 81 – Atlanta Falcons

Austin Hooper, TE, Stanford

This isn’t the strongest tight end class, but there’s a number of quality players at the position regardless. Stanford are as good as anyone at delivering players in to the NFL at the position, and Hooper is the latest. He doesn’t have elite size, but is a good athlete with a lot of likeable traits i nthe pass game in particular. He gets up and high points the ball well and works in space and traffic. He’s no Gonzalez replacement, but he’s better than what they had. This fits a need and is reasonable value, even though I’d argue that South Carolina’s Jerell Adams is better. Rebecca Rennie

Player Analysis

Just three years removed from high school, Hooper chose to give up two years of remaining eligibility to enter the 2016 draft.  His production in just his two playing seasons for the Cardinal has given plenty of good film to judge him on though, including a strong redshirt freshman season that saw him collect 40 catches for 499 yards and a pair of touchdowns.  He followed that with a slightly reduced 34 receptions for 438 yards, but this time with 6 TD catches.  Hooper isn’t the biggest at just over 6ft 3 1/2, but has a fairly well developed build, and makes up for his modest length by being an impressive athlete with nice quickness, both in terms of straight-line speed and in short area movements.  There’s plenty of natural receiving traits in his game, with great hands that included some difficult grabs either away from his body or under tight coverage.  Those skills are what will most likely see Hooper selected before the end of day 2.  There are a number of pro-ready elements to the game that could similarly see him have an impact as a rookie, in much the same way he quickly made an impact as a redshirt freshman.  Stanford has a good recent record during the David Shaw era for sending productive tight ends into the NFL.  That pipeline will add an extra level of trust to teams in feeling comfortable choosing Hooper.  Unsurprisingly, given the team he leaves, Hooper is a typically tough and high effort player, who isn’t scared to take a hit and will fight through attempted tackles to make the most of each reception where he can.  It’s always a little bit of a surprise each time a redshirt sophomore chooses to enter the draft early, but it’s become more common, and Hooper certainly gives a good boost to the TE group in 2016.  It’s quite likely that the relatively lesser number of next-level players at his position played a part in that decision and to take advantage of it.  It could work out as planned. (Rebecca Rennie)

Grade B-

Pick 82 – Indianapolis Colts

Le’Raven Clark, OT, Texas Tech

Clark has unbelieveable length in his arms, and when blocking on the outside, he is very effective. If he can learn to block inside to out then he will learn that not many to follow the arch he creates round to the Quarterback. With 51 starts during his college career, Andrew Luck is getting a player who knows the position and knows how to play it. Hopefully he learns on the job. Thomas Clapham

Player Analysis

If you were to build the prototypical offensive tackle, they would both look and move like Le’Raven Clark.  In addition to his 6ft 5, 316 lb muscular and toned frame, he has exceptionally long arms of over 36 inches and a fraction short of 12” hands.  He has arguably the fastest feet in this class that can match up with the quickest of edge rushers.  The raw tools are there for Clark to become a very talented starting left tackle in the league with as much upside as anyone.  The issue is that right now he isn’t using all those physical abilities well.  His film at times is downright bad.  Despite his quick footwork, he has so much trouble handling speed off the edge; athletic rushers continually found success past Clark over the past couple seasons.  His technique is inconsistent and frequently his lower body regresses into panicky choppy steps when under pressure that sees him give up far too many easy pressures and sacks.  As high a potential ceiling as Clark has, his possible floor to bust is equally low.  His cause is further not helped by the offensive system he enters the league from that is run by the Red Raiders, who has been drilled with a variety of techniques which are not suitable for the pro game, and he’ll have to unlearn a lot and rebuilt; a lot of those old habits won’t be easy to shake. Rebecca Rennie

Grade B+

Pick 83 – New York Jets

Jordan Jenkins, LB, Georgia

The Jets added Darron Lee in the first round for some speed, now they add their pass rush. Or at least are hoping to. Jenkins isn’t going to win with speed around the edge but he isn’t quite powerful enough to just overpower opponents.

Player Analysis

It wasn’t quite the final year that Jenkins would have been hoping for when he returned to play his senior season for the Bulldogs as the team failed to meet high expectations.  From a personal point of view though, it was another decent season of production from a player who has put up some solid numbers throughout his college career.  Even so, his 21 QB hurries in 2014 dropped to just 5 this year, his tackles from 70 to 59, and while his backfield numbers remained steady, that was boosted by one game against a struggling Vanderbilt team with 5.5 of his 10.5 TFLs on the year, over half, coming in that one albeit impressive outing.  Jenkins lacks an ideal build, and while he wins a lot due to his relentless effort, is not the greatest athlete either, lacking ideal speed.  He plays a lot as a down lineman in 4 man fronts, but would likely have to play from a 2 point stance primarily in the NFL.  An area where he could make a conversion is to a 4-3 off-ball LB or even as an inside backer in a 3-4; that is a transition he has the potential to make and could excel at given a bit of time.  Ultimately, the upside with Jenkins isn’t overly high, but he is a stout player again the run, gives everything he has got each play, and finds a way to make plays in the backfield, something he has shown consistently over four strong years against top opposition in the SEC. (Rebecca Rennie)

Grade B-


2016 NFL Draft: Round 3 Analysis & Grades – Picks 79 – 83

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