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Minecraft

23 Dec 2020

Minecraft: Dream Responds to Speedrun Cheating Allegations in New Response Video

Minecraft isn't a game with much controversy, but a recent controversial story has seen fast rising Youtuber Dream get accused of cheating during Minecraft speedruns on Twitch.tv - and subsequently removed from the speedrunning leaderboard.

In a new response video, Dream tackles these allegations, and hires statisticians and more to challenge the data posed by the Minecraft speedrunning moderation team in their original 28 page research report.

Let's dive into the Dream response video around his Minecraft speedrun cheating allegations.

Dream Response Video

Dream has finally responded formally to his cheating allegations by the Minecraft Speedrunning Moderation team - and the video is now live on Youtube.

You can watch the video in full below:

In the video, Dream continues to deny any tampering or cheating for his World Record leaderboard Minecraft speedruns in 1.16 as streamed on Twitch.tv.

Minecraft Dream Response Video Cheating Speedrun Allegations
FIRST RESPONSES: Dream first responded to the cheating allegations on Twitter

Dream's video spends a lot of time going over the framing of the initial allegations, and some discrepancies he sees in the data.

Dream's response video also brings plenty of new analysis and research forward on the topic.

You can read over the full report put forward by Dream here.

For the statistics that were presented in the original allegations, Dream suggests there were many errors, as found by his own hired statistician.

The Allegations

Dream's video responds to this research document, posted by the Minecraft Speedrunning Moderation team which went over 6 Minecraft speedruns that Dream streamed to Twitch.tv.

Minecraft speedrun dream cheating response video allegations research data
THE DATA: The Minecraft Speedrun Moderation team originally put out a 28 page research report on Dream's speedruns

These 6 speedruns saw significantly high amounts of luck in blaze rod drop rates and piglin bartering success.

These numbers, combined with the likelihood of being streamed by a top 1000 speedrunner, ran the odds to 1 in 7.5 trillion, according to the report.

In Dream's response video, he tackles these statistics and how they were framed to refute the conclusions presented and attempt to clear his name in the Minecraft speedrunning community.