F1 2019: Everything you need to know about leagues

Tired of getting taken out at turn one? Yeah me too, thats why a lot of people are turning to making leagues nowadays. Here's the best way to go about it.


So you’ve decided you want to make or join a league. There’ are a few key considerations to think about. Here im going to make your life a hell of a lot easier and outline the main ones. 

Joining a league

When joining a league you need to think about a few key considerations. Chief among them is “do I want to emulate a real life F1 season, or make the cars more fair for closer racing?”. If you chose the former there are several performance leagues out there to take a look at (totdracing.com is probably the best one out there). Equally if you’re more interested in the equal racing side of things this is the more traditional route most leagues tend to go with and you will be spoilt for choice.

In terms of conduct, this isn’t like an online lobby. So if you deliberately take someone out or are reckless, don’t be surprised to get kicked out. People take their league racing seriously and I think the best way to look at it is, “this is my opportunity to become a better racer myself and learn from people better than me”. You won’t be the fastest, but F1 is one of those games where time spent definitely increases performance and surrounding yourself with the best and you are bound to see results, eventually.

Making a league 

Right from day one there is a lot to make sure you get right, have a solid team of admins around you. Mates, people you know from online racing. Either way, they have to be people you trust. Assign responsibilities for these people. Some responsibilities you might need to think about include. 

– Setting up rules and regulations
– Someone/people in charge of reviewing incidents and dealing out penalties
– People that deal with appeals
– Someone who control the day-to-day running of the league, a go-to guy, usually really likeable and someone all personality types feel comfortable with.
– Expansion and development, where are you going with the league? How do you plan to expand? 2 tiers, 3 tiers?  

F1 2019’s In-built features 

Thankfully, the new F1 game for this year should make your life a lot easier. To start with you make a logo (bit cheesy) but as you have seen from above a lot of leagues choose to make their own websites with bespoke logos. Once you have completed the set-up part of the league, you are then presented with a schedule. Which days do you want people to race on? Are you going to have more than one race a week? Are you going to have any scheduled weeks off, in which case how many and how spaced apart are you going to make them?

Another key consideration is the weekend structure, for those performance racing leagues you may want to consider running 100% race distance events compared to equal performance 50% races due to the sheer intensity of that close competition. Most people opt for a short qualifying format but if you have 20 drivers turning up week in-week out full qualifying may also be something you want to consider.

You may want to instil some assist regulations as to prevent rookies from joining and using brake assist as we all know how early the game brakes the car with that on. You may want people to experience a more realistic league with performance cars and limited assists like no TCS, simulation damage etc.

Finally F1 2019 has brought in AI substitutes, so should one of your drivers not be able to make it an AI will sub in for them. What difficulty are you going to put them on? From an admin perspective on the main screen you can manage applications to the league, the calendar, invites, track selection, and the ability to send notifications to other league members informing them of votes potentially to change how the league is run. 

Legacy 

Once everything’s said and done, if you are going about making a league you need to ensure it is self-sustaining, so if you decide to step down from your admin role within the league everything is in place so it can continue growing and developing. This means making sure that all the processes you are putting in place are simple, replicable and ultimately you have someone in place to take over once you’re gone. 

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Matt Ashman

76

Biosciences graduate with a massive passion for anything with an engine.

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